Home

Back to HOME page

Demonstrations

Forthcoming Demonstrations


Previous Demonstrations


Beccy Boxer

Tessa Wolfe Murray

Jane Cox

Ben Davies

Rich Miller

Felicity Lloyd Coombes

Margaret Gardiner

Jill Ford

Ian Harris

Mark Smith

Steve Woodhead

Sally Woodford

Emily Myers

Gareth Mason

Sally McDonnell

Ostinelli & Priest

Richard Baxter

Claire Wakefield

Tina Vlassopolulos

Matthew Blakeley

Richard Godfrey

Jim Robison

Jo Connell

Elaine Peto

Jack Doherty

Tessa Wolfe Murray

Jeremy Nichols

Fran Tristram

Chris Bramble

Influenced by both archaeology and geology her work reflects the effect of time on materials, as seen in the processes that shape our landscape and the marks left behind by the people and other life forms that live and have lived within it.

Tessa Wolfe Murray developed her smoke firing technique as a result of determined necessity coupled with a fascination with fire. The traditional method of burying a low or unfired pot in sawdust underground or in a container and leaving it to burn slowly for between 8 and 24 hours did not suit the pots she wanted to make.

Jane Cox trained at Camberwell College of Art (1988-1992) and at the Royal College of Art (1992-1994), and has won several awards for her work including the Wedgwood Scholarship for surface design. Her work is collected for its use of rich jewel like glazes and stylish elegant forms.

Uses a variety of coloured and textured clays to create distinctive coiled pots which take their forms and surfaces from nature, with particular inspiration coming from beach stones and geological strata. By combining clays and layering slips, using a range of techniques, he is able to create dramatic effects without the use of glazes.

Richard Heeley

His designs are developed on the North Wales coast where he spends a quarter of his working year recording in a variety of media the textures, shapes, colour and structure of the coastal landscape. This rich source of inspiration has a simple quiet affinity with the clay and processes that he uses.

Elaine Peto

Each animal is individually made by the process of slab building in clay, i.e. rolling out a sheet of clay and forming the body, then gradually adding slab by slab to form the whole animal. The details are then remodelled until the animal is complete. It is then biscuit fired, glazed and refired to stoneware temperature.


Mike Goddard

Mike Goddard showed us his masterly throwing accompanied by his partner Margaret who not only showed us her gorgeous sgraffito decoration but allowed us to try it ourselves. Splitting his time between Becque, Kent and the Dordogne he takes influences from all three to produce his unique vessels.

Peter showed us how to take photographs of our work (useful for our new website and facebook pages).

Peter Searight is a Fine Art Fellow of the British Institute of Professional Photography and a widely exhibited award winning photographer.

 www.theremarkablestudio.com

Peter  Searight

Mark Dally - Sunday 22nd April  

Usual venue of East Clandon Village Hall  See Newsletter for full details and form

Mark uses white earthenware decorated with black slip and underglaze.

Jon Barrett-Danes - Sunday 30th September

Jn will show us how he makes his amazing sculptural animals

Usual venue of East Clandon Village Hall. Keep this date in your diary.